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Now & Next
Diamond World Initiates “Technology for YOU” by Howard M. Pomerantz
By: Diamond World News Service
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Jul 30 2009 11:47PM
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Reference: 4021  

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We are please to begin with this issue a technology column offered by Howard Pomerantz.

Howard has developed a strong standing within the global jewellery industry. Specializing in international business dynamics, he is currently an advisor to multi-national industry corporations. Howard was reared and raised in a family retail diamond business.

He was the Executive Director of GIA Instruments, where he designed and patented the digital GIA Gemological Microscope. Known as the “BrandFather” of the GIA Facetware™, Howard lectured in India introducing our diamond cutting industry to the new GIA Cut grade. Most recently, he was President of Gemprint Corporation.

Howard was for many years Managing Director of Kerr Lab, producers of Lost Wax Casting products which was developed into the number one brand in India.

Howard holds a Presidential/Key Executive Masters Degree (PKE/MBA) in International Business from Pepperdines’ prestigious Graduate School of Business. Currently Pomerantz is President of Premier Diamond Technologies, specializing in Start Up & Turn Around Strategies including market planning, distribution and product design.

Pomerantz is involved in numerous industry associations or holds board positions including the Manufacturing Jewelers and Suppliers of America (MJSA), CIBJO, and the Jewelers 24kt Club. In 2006, Avi Paz bestowed an honorary title, “Ambassador to the United States” from the Israel Diamond Exchange. Howard is the current Roving Ambassador for the World Federation of Diamond Bourses (WFDB).

We welcome Howard’s cooperation and are sure that you will find innovative solutions to your technology questions with his help.

During my visitations to jewelers and diamond manufacturers, they express to me that they know “technology is important”. When I ask them if they placed technology on their business agenda, they say “not really”. Like many people, we often focus on what is urgent, but not what is important.

“NOW and NEXT” intends to discuss trends in technology NOW and what should be considered for your business. “NOW and NEXT “ will endeavor to lead you to innovative technology that will help you set your own technology goals.

Gold & Diamonds Sacred for India :

NOW: Since 1974 I have been traveling throughout India and I learned early in my travels that the Indian jewellery industry is ancestral. Integrity is the fabric of the Indian Jewellery industry. It is not unusual for Indian’s to have a family jeweller that runs back generations. They trust their family jeweller. Indian jewellers exhibit to their community professional knowledge, but more importantly their understanding that gold and diamonds are sacred. Therefore an Indian jeweller understands the importance of trust and confidence to be at the core of the jewellery transaction. These industry leaders understand that gold and diamonds are timeless and part of a belief. This system has spanned centuries.

We entered this century with technology at our industry’s doorstep. Embraced, the Indian jewellers can further demonstrate leadership through the uses of technology, further enhancing consumer confidence in the community they have served for generations.

Whether technology is used to demonstrate the purity of gold or to identify natural diamonds, technology will help the Indian jeweller and manufacturer profit by demonstrating innovative leadership. In “Now and Next” we will explore Internet Trading Platforms, Cutting Planning software, Clarity & plus Plotting software of rough, Diamond Identification such as Country of Origin, Optical Brilliance and Symmetry technology, Synthetic Detection, HPHT and various treatment equipment, Proportion Analyzers, Ray Tracing systems, Cut Grading software, Diamond Light Behavior and more.

Now, Next & Never Technology?

At press time, I learned that Collector’s Universe decided to cease development of Gemprint and is looking for a suitor. What does this mean? Considering this decision comes on the heels of their exiting the grading laboratory industry by selling off those assets in April, are they selling off the Gemprint assets or simply shutting it down.

Gemprint has been a product with nine lives over the past 30 years. Is this the last life? Many questions are left to be answered. Are they closing down the company or will they be appointing full industry service provider for the Gemprint asset? Will the current country of origin diamond programs that use Gemprint be able to continue? Will insurance companies continue to offer discounts if the parent corporation is not supporting it with their own internal resources? What happens and who controls the database of 30 years?

The all but de-funct Gemprint saga is relative and in fact central to this months “Now and Next” technology article. The true importance underscores the “Next” factor that I am trying to impress on you.

NEXT:

Next finds our industry in need for diamond matching technology, particularly if Gemprint becomes fully absent. Polished diamond matching has demonstrated growing importance. It has built on the rough side of the Kimberly Process being able to identify polished diamonds from declared rough.

Polished Diamond Matching Important :

Diamond matching is building confidence in buyers after consumers eyes were opened by the movie “Blood Diamonds”. Firms such as MotiGanz began to use diamond matching as a country of origin program for diamonds manufactured in Botswana. Rio Tinto began considering this for their Select Diamantaire Mark program. Firms like WDC Waldman Diamond Group began using it for their source of origin from Canada program.

Diamond internet providers have learned the importance of using diamond match verification to match a diamond when received back from a consumer for credit. The Banking sector desires diamond matching for inventory accountability. Higher loan amounts may be gained with lower interest rates to companies that are willing to have their diamond inventory matched.

The matching of diamonds has shown importance to retailers because they now have a way to address the age old question from their consumer. “How do I know that you are giving me back the same diamond”?

While one can assume that the all but de-funct Gemprint may find a business suitor who emerges, they will find a technology arena that is quickly filling up with diamond matching competitors that rival or exceed the next set of requirements from our industry.

NEXT …we will introduce you to several diamond matching systems that may soon fill up that arena.

If If you have technology items of interest or would like to be part of his mailing list on technology or wish to communicate with Howard, you may write directly to: Diamondworld@Premiergroup.us

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H. Bridge
(Seattle)
Bravo for attempting to elevate consumer confidence. Our stores, our industry and all of our clients will benefit through addtional confidence measurements.
Charles Slaven
(Merritt Island)
Then we wouldn't be at the mercy of a system like GemPrint that has failed to develop a user friendly system that is reproduceable without a very expensive piece of equipment and a system that the client can't reproduce the results for themselves. Just teach them about their unique diamond and they will know it forever. What true jeweler has ever shown a client (especially a lady) a feather or a carbon inclusion in their diamond and had them not be able to find it again with even just a 10x loop or in most cases their unaided eyes. Let's become the trained professionals we should be and train our clients what they need to know to feel safe and secure with their diamonds, and with us!
Charles Slaven
(Merritt Island)
I guess the real difference I see in our industry is that between those of us who try and be true professionals by educating ourselves and then educating our clients, and those who are just minimum wage sales clerks acting like they know what they are doing without any real training. I have never had a client question if they are getting their diamond back when I have taken the time to show them the fingerprints that are naturally in their diamonds. When they see the natural inclusions or the extra facets or whatever unique features that their stone contains once... they never have to worry again if they are getting back the same diamond they left for repair. This same system works with all stones that have natural inclusions, but it does require that the people in our business who call themselves jewelers spend the time and money to learn about what they are dealing with. Imagine that, real trained jewelers selling jewelery and working with clients, what a concept!!! Then we would
Charles Slaven
(Merritt Island)
I guess the real difference I see in our industry is that between those of us who try and be true professionals by educating ourselves and then educating our clients, and those who are just minimum wage sales clerks acting like they know what they are doing without any real training. I have never had a client question if they are getting their diamond back when I have taken the time to show them the fingerprints that are naturally in their diamonds. When they see the natural inclusions or the extra facets or whatever unique features that their stone contains once... they never have to worry again if they are getting back the same diamond they left for repair. This same system works with all stones that have natural inclusions, but it does require that the people in our business who call themselves jewelers spend the time and money to learn about what they are dealing with. Imagine that, real trained jewelers selling jewelery and working with clients, what a concept!!! Then we would
Bryan Boyne
(Houston)
As you point out there is a demand at many levels of the industry for matching technology. I would be surprised if gemprint just "goes away" as it seemed to be a very reliable and easy to use technology. As one person commented, it was a shame that it was taken out of the broad market and put to use exclusively for one company. It seems like it would have great potential to "go public" again. In lieue of gemprint, are there other light mapping technologies on the market that can reliably differentiate between individual diamonds? I look forward to reading your technology articles regularly. Bryan Boyne,g.g. Houston, TX
Bryan Boyne
(Houston)
As you point out there is a demand at many levels of the industry for matching technology. I would be surprised if gemprint just "goes away" as it seemed to be a very reliable and easy to use technology. As one person commented, it was a shame that it was taken out of the broad market and put to use exclusively for one company. It seems like it would have great potential to "go public" again. In lieue of gemprint, are there other light mapping technologies on the market that can reliably differentiate between individual diamonds? I look forward to reading your technology articles regularly. Bryan Boyne,g.g. Houston, TX
Paul S.
(Chicago)
Gemprint promoted only GCAL and did not benefit the whole industry. If or Sarin or another company offered such device it may become more popular with all labs and retailers.
D H
(Sydney)
Thankyou for this informative article. Anything that we the retailer or vender can do to increase consumer confidence must be seriously considered. It is important that this tecnology is promoted as value added and not as a way of using fear to promote individual businesses above others. We should focus on the good and not scare monger against charletons, which are a minority in our industry. By doing this we reduce our whole industry. I look forward to reading further on this issue.
Stephen Cleve
(Kansas City)
Mr. Pomerantz, our industry is not ready for diamond matching. It rejected GCAL partly for Gemprint. You know technology well and I like you digital microscope very much. While daniel is correct about technology bringing more confidence, you have an up hill battle with our industry embracing tracing technology. Well done article.
Daniel Katz
(Sydney NSW)
Technology...it's the one factor most uneducated diamond vendors fear and the one factor educated diamond buyers appreciate.It's ridiculous that diamond buyers who have done serious research prior to buying a diamond soon discover that they end up knowing more about diamonds than the diamond vendors pretending to be experts.Diamond vendors lack of product knowledge is reflected by a diamond buyer's confidence in who they are dealing with.Sadly there are too many charlatans who have infiltrated our diamond industry. Technology eliminates all those who are only in it for the fast buck.The more technology >> the more professional >> the more confidence >> more diamond sales. How difficult can it be ? Daniel F Katz GG www.DiamondImports.com.au Sydney NSW, Australia
Patty
(Richmond)
Your article was informative and we are looking to replace Gemex. If you would write comparison information from anyone using different systems it would be valuable for the industry.
Stuart Goodman
(Hampton)
We need this type of intellect in our industry. Howard has been a conduit between all phases of our industry for many years.It is a great pleasure to welcome Howard Pomerantz to Diamond Worlds Editorial Staff. I consider Howard to be a visionary with our industry.
KG
(Surat,)
DiamondWorld is complimented for bringing us this caliber of a writer. I met Mr. Pomerantz when he lectured in Surat. He spoke with good knowledge and answered questions straight forward. GIA never did before and many in the audience were surprised but pleased with his frank candor.
Daniel Katz
(Sydney NSW)
In reply to " The matching of diamonds has shown importance to retailers because they now have a way to address the age old question from their consumer. “How do I know that you are giving me back the same diamond”? " Very Simple and quick. One method is laser inscription of diamonds prevents any questionable activity. I am often amazed how those who certify diamonds refuse to pay for the extra service. It provides consumer confidence. However the differences between safe cold laser and risky hot laser inscription of diamonds should always be disclosed to the consumer. GIA dossier grading reports rather than full reports automatically cold laser inscribe diamonds in lieu of plotting inclusions. In todays world there is no excuse for not laser inscribing any certified diamond as one method of identification. Daniel F Katz GG www.DiamondImports.com.au
Topel
(Mumbai)
Mr. Pomerantz your respespect of the trust between Indian Jewlerers and their clienrs demonstrates your understanding of the Indian market. I have lived in Mumbai for 12 years and most Americans have no idea of the better ethics here then on 47th St. in New York.
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